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CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Australia's most popular teacher aide course at the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses

ITAC's CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support


Australia’s most popular teacher aide course


ITAC's CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the introductory teacher aide course for anyone seeking employment as a support worker in an Australian school. Graduates of ITAC's CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support are able to provide support to teachers and students by applying a range of teaching and learning strategies under the direction of their teacher. They also employ basic behaviour management techniques and assist the teacher with the operational and logistical needs of the classroom.


ITAC’s CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support covers all of the essential, practical and research-based techniques, strategies and skills required to effectively contribute to students’ learning and development. This includes best practice questioning techniques, feedback skills, one-on-one instruction, small group work, literacy and numeracy strategies, play-based learning and metacognitive skills.


Learners who undertake the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support by distance or class-based mode complete a series of theory assessments as well as a placement in a local school. ITAC students have 24/7 access to their portal where they will find hundreds of resources including webinars, lectures, readings, interactive activities and a free copy of their learner guide. All of ITAC’s courses are fully supported, structured and self-paced which is perfect for busy adult learners who need understanding, flexibility and a range of support services.

INCLUDED IN THE COURSE

SUBSIDISED FROM $50 (QLD)

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

INCLUDES ALL LEARNER GUIDES

NO ADDITIONAL OR HIDDEN FEES

CLASS, DISTANCE & RPL MODE

30 DAY NO-OBLIGATION PERIOD

LIVE & PRE-RECORDED WEBINARS

WORKPLACE VISITS FOR ALL

HARDCOPY CERTIFICATE

Course Details: CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Qualification

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Nationally recognised

Yes. This nationally recognised teacher aide qualification is recognised in all states and territories of Australia.

Locations

All locations in Australia including WA, QLD, NSW, ACT, Victoria and SA.

Distance/online mode

Supported, structured & self-paced online mode for learners likely to be successful in an external program of study.

Class-based mode

Perth (Cockburn) and Brisbane CBD. Workshops are held 1 day per week for 10 weeks plus ongoing support & live webinars. Workshops introduce learners to the main topics and start every school term. Note most class-based students enrol in the Teacher Aide Combo. Click here to view the class calendar.

Virtual class mode

Keep yourself on track by attending virtual classes held 1 day per week for 10 weeks (9:30-2:15) from the comfort of your own home. Complete set activities and participate in live webinars with our easy to use platform. Click here to view the class calendar.

RPL

Recognition of prior learning is available for experienced workers seeking recognition of their existing skills and knowledge. RPL applies to people who are currently working as a teacher aide in an Australian school and who have 5 or more years' paid experience.

Time to complete

A learner who has no experience with children or any previous study or employment history, may take 26 weeks or 600 hours to complete this course. Learners who have experience with children (including parents), related industries such as childcare or aged care, or who have studied at this level or higher, are likely to complete this course in a shorter period of time.

Enrolment period

Learners are initially provided with 12 months in order to complete their course. This allows for periods of illness, travel and other interruptions. (ITAC is providing all new and existing enrolments with an additional 4-months’ free extension due to COVID-19).

Assessments

The majority of assessments are short answer questions. Students also complete scenarios, a workplace demonstration and submit a portfolio.

Work placement

Students are required to undertake a structured 100-hour placement in a local school. As part of our commitment to providing a high level of quality service, we visit all students during their placement.

Topics

Teaching and learning strategies such as scaffolding, play-based learning, formative assessment, remedial and intervention support, phonics, and a range of best practice reading, writing and numeracy support strategies. Students also learn modern behaviour management techniques, strategies for supporting students with special needs such as Autism, and effective ways of assisting the teacher with the operational needs of the classroom.

Employability

Graduates of this teacher aide course may find work in mainstream settings particularly in lower grades where teachers need additional support for logistical and operational tasks. Graduates may also be employed to support students with disabilities or disorders in a range of programs.

Certificate

On completion you will be issued an embossed hardcopy certificate with gold foil and presentation folder (including postage to an Australian address).

Government payments (Centrelink)

This course meets the requirements of an approved course of education and study from an approved Education Provider for the purpose of qualifying for a student payment. Information about student payments can be found on the Services Australia website.

Nationally Recognised Training logo QLD training award 2020 state finalist AQF logo
iteca membership logo skills assure logo

Units of Competency for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

1 CHCECE006 Support behaviour of children and young people
2 CHCEDS002 Assist in implementation of planned educational programs
3 CHCEDS003 Contribute to student education in all developmental domains
4 CHCEDS004 Contribute to organisation and management of classroom or centre
5 CHCEDS005 Support the development of literacy and oral language skills
6 CHCEDS006 Support the development of numeracy skills
7 CHCEDS007 Work effectively with students and colleagues
8 CHCEDS008 Comply with school administrative requirements
9 CHCEDS012 Set up and sustain individual and small group learning areas
10 CHCEDS017 Contribute to the health and safety of students
11 CHCEDS018 Support students with additional needs in the classroom environment
12 CHCEDS021 Assist in facilitation of student learning
13 CHCEDS001 Comply with legislative, policy and industrial requirements in the education environment
14 CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety
15 CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people
16 CHCEDS026 Deliver elements of teaching and learning programs
17 HLTWHS001 Participate in workplace health and safety

Click here to read the unit descriptions

Minimum requirements

No previous qualifications or experience required.

Physical capability

Conduct learning activities with children including games inside and outside of the classroom.

IT resources

Access to a computer with an internet connection, desktop applications, PDF reader and other basics.

IT skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as opening PDFs and watching videos.

Numeracy skills

Candidates will need basic numeracy skills to count, add and subtract.

Language skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as reading and comprehending lesson plans.

Age

Be aged 16 years or over.

Clearances

Students must obtain (early in their course or beforehand) the relevant clearance to work with children such as Blue Card(QLD), WWVP(ACT, TAS), or WWCC(WA, Vic., NSW, SA, NT). Some states require more than 1 clearance such as WA. Click here for details.

Visas

ITAC are unable to enrol individuals on a student visa. If you are in Australia on a student visa, you can find CRICOS providers here.

Standard enrolment - $1920 (QLD, WA, SA, Vic & NSW)

Payment plans from $40 per week. Click here for details.

$100
QLD subsidised non-concessional co-contribution fee
$50
QLD subsidised concessional co-contribution fee
$0
QLD subsidised Yr. 12 graduate co-contribution fee
RPL QLD subsidised
Co-contribution fee $50 concessional, $100 non-concessional.
Standard RPL - $1500

Payment plans from $50 per week. Click here for details.

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$40 per week

48

$1920

Fortnightly

$80 per fortnight

24

$1920

Monthly

$160 per month

12

$1920

6 Payments

$320 per month

6

$1920

2 Payments

$960 per month

2

$1920

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$50 per week

30

$1500

Fortnightly

$100 per fortnight

15

$1500

Monthly

$250 per month

6

$1500

5 Payments

$500 per month

3

$1500

2 Payments

$750 per month

2

$1500

Nationally Recognised Training logo QLD training award 2020 state finalist AQF logo
iteca membership logo skills assure logo

AUSTRALIA'S MOST POPULAR TEACHER AIDE COURSES

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

1 IN 2 CHOOSE ITAC

1 in 2 study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with ITAC.

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

Interest free plans from $40 - no hidden fees, includes all resources.

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES

From $50 - courses subsidised by the Queensland government.

SUPPORT

Friendly trainers with years of experience in local schools.

PLACEMENT

We visit every learner on placement to help improve your practice.

30-DAY NO OBLIGATION

A 30-day no obligation period so you can be sure the course is for you.

MODES

Supported, self-paced distance mode or class from 1 day per week.

RESEARCH-BASED CONTENT

Learn industry best practice and research-based pedagogy.

ESTABLISHED PROVIDER

An established provider with more than 5000 happy graduates.

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the difference between the Certificate III and IV in Education Support?

The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the introductory teacher aide course for anyone seeking to become a teacher aide in Australia. It covers all of the basics of working in an Australian school as a teacher aide under the guidance of a classroom teacher. ITAC students learn the essential skills to support teachers and students in the mainstream classroom setting including literacy and numeracy support, behaviour management and a range of pedagogical skills and techniques. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to implement effective, common and research-based teaching strategies and behaviour management techniques as well as support the general operational needs of the classroom.


Teacher aide in classroom after graduating from the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Student from the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses pictured in a school after completing her CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. Could this be you in a few months?


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support on the other hand, covers the same content as the Certificate III but in the context of supporting students with complex needs such as students with disabilities, disorders and comorbidities (multiple disabilities or issues). This includes three key areas:

  • physical disabilities (such as hearing impairment),
  • learning disorders such as dyslexia, and
  • neurological disorders such as autism.

Graduates of the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support can work in any classroom or school in any Australian state or territory, including primary schools, high schools and special need's centres. It is the highest teacher aide course available and therefore qualifies you to work in any school and position in terms of education support work. Graduates from reputable providers who have developed a high level of pedagogical knowledge (knowledge of best practice teaching) are sought after and valued members of the educational team.


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support has higher job prospects than the lower-level teacher aide course because graduates have the ability to support students with complex special needs. Many students therefore choose to enrol in the higher Certificate IV course or the popular Teacher Aide Combo which combines 2 qualifications into one streamlined program.


The Teacher Aide Combo is ITACs most popular program mainly due to the time and cost savings (over $1500). Fluent English speakers, especially those who have experience with children (including parents) are recommended to move straight into ITAC's Teacher Aide Combo or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. However, the Teacher Aide Combo is unfortunately not available for government funded students due to the structure of government funded programs.


ITAC recommends the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support for anyone that feels that they are not capable of completing the higher level teacher aide course: CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support or the combo. This generally applies to students who are in high school, recent migrants to Australia, people who are still learning to speak English and people with learning disorders. Please speak with our student advisors on 1300 858 191 for advice that is specific to your situation or send us a quick question.


For more information about these nationally recognised teacher aide courses, we highly recommend reading this detailed article: CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support: Everything you need to know as well as CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support: Everything you need to know.

2. Is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support a government-funded teacher aide course?

The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is only government funded in Queensland at this stage. As funding or subsidises are not available outside of Queensland for teacher aide courses, ITAC has decided to offer the Teacher Aide Combo for a significantly discounted course fee of $2500. This means a savings of $1580 (or just under 40%) compared to completing the 2 teacher aide courses separately. The combo also saves a huge amount of time, meaning you can be in the workforce earning money or applying for teacher aide jobs with 2 qualifications – double the firepower on your resume!


The Queensland government provides subsidies to eligible students under the Certificate 3 Guarantee(for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support). This funding is paid directly to ITAC by the government, meaning students only need to complete an enrolment form – no additional applications or paperwork – we take care of everything at our end so you can sit back and spend all of your time and energy on your teacher aide course.


The course fee (what is called the co-contribution fee) for a government subsidised teacher aide course such as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is currently $50 for concession students and $100 for standard enrolments (non-concession). Year 12 graduates (who graduated year 12 in Queensland the previous school year) may even be eligible for fee-free training.


The main eligibility requirements for the Certificate 3 Guarantee are to be:

  • residing in Queensland,
  • to be an Austalian citizen or permanent resident (some visas are accepted as well), and
  • to not already hold (or be enrolled in) a qualification at Certificate III level or above (excluding courses completed at school). This includes anyone who has completed a university degree in Australia or overseas.

This information is general and has been simplified for readability. You can find more information about the Certificate 3 guarantee on the QLD Department of Education’s website or by reading the program fact sheets. Alternatively contact our office for advice specific to your situation and how our teacher aide courses can help you with reaching your goals.

3. Should I enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or another course?

Generally speaking, we advise fee-paying students to enrol in the Teacher Aide Combo as this maximises your job prospects – two certificates to show the school when going for an interview is much better than one! The combo is a streamlined program that takes not much more time than an individual course and is very cost effective compared to the price of enrolling in two teacher aide courses separately.


While not as common these days, some schools prefer that staff have comleted the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support as it is known to cover all of the basics. Most however, understand that the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is a higher qualification that covers everything in the Certificate III and more. Having completed both teacher aide courses means you cover all your bases and are eligible for every support position advertised by a school. For those looking to enter the industry long term, ITAC's Teacher Aide Combo also saves you the effort of completing one course this year and then returning to complete a second teacher aide course down the track – a common pattern we see regularly.


Teacher aide and student in classroom

Students who complete the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support can work in both mainstream classrooms and special needs schools.


Teacher’s aides can be employed in a range of different schools including primary and high schools, special needs and specialist programs.


However, for those residing in Queensland, government funding is only available for individual teacher aide courses. We therefore advise QLD students to begin with the lower level course initially (CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support) and to then complete the higher-level teacher aide course soon afterwards. This still provides you with both qualifications with the same end result of the Teacher Aide Combo. As there is a lot of overlap between the 2 courses, you will find the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support easier and quicker than the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support once you have graduated from the lower-level teacher aide course. As we have discussed earlier, both teacher aide courses cover very similar content such as teaching strategies and behaviour management techniques, albeit with different cohorts of students.


Some students choose (or are advised) to enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support as they may not be ready to attempt the higher-level teacher aide course or the combo. This includes students who:

  • are in high school,
  • have learning disorders,
  • have poor English language skills (non-native speakers learning English),
  • suffer from mild mental health issues, as well as various other reasons.

This advice is general only – please speak with one of our advisors for the best information relevant to your situation, goals and needs in terms of enrolling and completing a teacher aide course. You can also read one of our many blogs for more detailed guidance, such as this one: CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support: Everything you need to know.

4. What is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the introductory or beginning qualification for people seeking employment in an Australian school as a:

  • teacher aide,
  • teacher assistant,
  • education support worker,
  • education assistant,
  • integration aide,
  • special needs education assistant,
  • classroom assistant,
  • school support officer (SSO), or
  • learning support officer.

This popular teacher aide course covers all the basics of working in a classroom under the close direction of the coordinating teacher and is designed mainly for people who intend to work in mainstream settings. Students in this course are not normally intending to work with students with special needs such as autism, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.


On the other hand, the higher-level teacher aide course – CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support – is considered to be the ‘special need's qualification’ by those in the industry who hire and manage teacher aides. It is geared towards working with students with special needs such as those with neurological and/or physical disorders. Graduates are sought after particularly if they are trained by reputable providers and therefore have high pedagogical knowledge such as best practice one-on-one instruction, explicit instruction, the levels of instruction, scaffolding, questioning and feedback techniques, formative assessment and other such common and essential skills that schools demand.


Regardless of which teacher aide course you choose to enrol in, you will learn the same essential, effective, practical, and invaluable skills based on industry best practice and the latest research. These are the skills that all teacher aides need to know in order to be effective in their work and to provide the best service to their students, teachers and the wider school community. These skills can be broadly categorised into four key areas:


1. Teaching and learning strategies such as:

  • best practice one-on-one instruction,
  • scaffolding and modelling,
  • the levels of instruction,
  • questioning and feedback techniques,
  • pair and group work (cooperative learning),
  • literacy strategies like active reading, pre-reading and post-reading tasks,
  • explicit instruction,
  • play-based learning, and
  • a range of other essential strategies and skills.

2. Behaviour management strategies such as:

  • developing routines and systems,
  • natural consequences,
  • low-key verbals,
  • proximity,
  • scanning,
  • individual behaviour management plans, and
  • using body language for various effects.

3. Professional skills such as:

  • duty of care,
  • hazard identification,
  • risk assessment,
  • knowledge of departmental and school-based policies, state/territory and federal laws, reporting procedures, responsibilities, expectations and job description forms,
  • identifying gaps in student learning,
  • planning learning activities,
  • developing resources, and
  • providing general logistical assistance to the teacher to ensure the continued and effective operation of the classroom.
Teacher aide in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support with whiteboard and marker in reading lesson.

Students in ITAC's CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support study a range of strategies including explicit instruction and reading skills.


4. Knowledge of students with additional needs, including being aware of the specific needs of students from minority groups or disadvantaged backgrounds. Additional needs in the context of teacher aide practice mainly refers to supporting special needs students and adapting:

  • instructional techniques,
  • resources and materials,
  • behaviour management techniques,
  • assistive technologies,
  • systems, plans and procedures,
  • policies and guidelines, and
  • routines, rules and consequences

You can learn more about the different roles of teacher aides in Australia by reading this article published by the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses: What do teacher aides do in Australia? As the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is a nationally recognised teacher aide course, all course requirements can be found on the government’s national register for Vocational Education and Training (VET). This page lists core units and packaging rules (in other words, the number and nature of electives that all providers must adhere to) and provides the following qualification description which underscores the intent and goals of this course:


‘This qualification reflects the role of workers in a range of education settings, including public and independent schools and community education settings, who provide assistance and support to teachers and students under broad-based supervision.’

5. How long does it take to complete the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

Most students complete the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support in 5-8 months, depending on:

  • how much time they devote each week to learning activities,
  • whether they have studied before at this or any other level, and
  • their experience with children or related caring industries (such as childcare, aged care, community services, youth work, health work etc.).

We generally advise that this teacher aide course takes around 600 hours however as the course is mostly self-paced this can vary between learners.


Students who have experience with children (including parents) or who have worked in similar industries (such as aged care, heath or childcare) usually finish their course in a shorter timeframe. This is because there are many transferrable skills (generic skills that are relevant in multiple contexts) such as communication including using appropriate verbal and non-verbal signals, adhering to policies and procedures such as WHS requirements, and interacting with clients (professional boundaries, reporting abuse and neglect, behaviour management, rapport building and so forth). These generic skills are developed with experience and are easily adapted to new contexts and situations. Adult learners bring a whole raft of these skills with them regardless of whether they have worked in a school previously.


The majority of students studying with the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses comfortably finish the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support by setting aside 10-20 hours per week for study, particularly in the first few months. This gives them a solid head start and means all (or most) of the theory can be completed while your motivation is at its highest point (motivation goes up and down like a wave as it does with any long-term project). How long it takes depends on many other factors such as:

  • your literacy level,
  • the speed you learn and complete assessments,
  • how fast you can read a chapter and write a paragraph,
  • your prior knowledge such as about safety, children, schools,
  • whether you get ill, go on holiday, or experience some other interruption,
  • your prior experience with studying and learning,
  • your routine and consistency, and
  • how much time you devote each week to learning.

All of these factors vary from person to person and mean an exact estimate for how long this teacher aide course will take to complete is very difficult to provide. For example, an assessment with 30 short-answer questions may take one student 50 hours to complete. However, a person with more experience (such as a parent with school volunteer experience) may finish the same assessment in 10-20 hours – some may even do it in a few hours!


While students of all ages enrol with the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses, many are parents of primary or high school-age children; the average age of our learners is 37. More mature learners have a natural advantage in terms of context, prior knowledge, experience and existing schema (ways of organising and categorising information based on experience and understanding) which often enables them to move through the course must faster and easier. Many aspects of your teacher aide course with ITAC will seem like a ‘no brainer’ especially to those who have raised children or who have worked in other ‘people-related’ industries such as childcare, aged care (or any professional environment that involves regular contact with and management of people – young, old, or anywhere in-between).


It is important to note that the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support with ITAC is self-paced – it’s what we call a ‘structured and supported self-paced course’. This means ITAC students can work through the learning and assessment materials at a rate that suits their needs, abilities, skills, interests, prior knowledge and experience in schools or with children (or even other industries).


Take a mother of 3 children for example who begins to learn about behaviour management in a classroom setting. This person is likely to be able to read and apply the common behaviour management techniques used by schools without too much difficulty. Their existing schema (mental framework) is capable of adopting and applying existing knowledge to new but related tasks and contexts. On the other hand, a person who has no experience with children, will take a lot longer to learn the same content, and will need more time to complete the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support.


A person who is new to the industry, who has never studied before, who has no work history and no experience with children (including as a parent, carer or guardian) is expected to take approximately 600 or more hours to complete this teacher aide course. This estimate is loosely based on the government’s published ‘nominal hours’ (which is a very rough guide). Many high school students will take more than 600 hours because they have little experience in the workplace and fewer transferrable skills (such as the ability to follow policies and procedures, or the knowledge of WHS requirements and reporting procedures). This is not always the case however and students fresh from school have more time and commonly have better than average study skills (as they were in school full-time not that long ago).


Some ITAC students will even take 1200 hours or more to complete either one of our teacher aide courses. However, this is rare and mainly applies to students who:

  • have learning disorders,
  • are new to Australia, are not familiar with Australia’s education system, and who do not have strong English language skills,
  • have no existing and relevant skills or knowledge including no previous work history, experience with children or other industries.

For students who fall into one of these categories, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support may not be suitable given the nature of the work (supporting children’s learning and language development requires a reasonable grasp of English). Other courses may be more appropriate such as a Certificate II level course, a bridging course or any other program designed to meet the needs of students who need additional support.


Finally, it’s important to understand that all ITAC students are required to complete the minimum 100-hour work placement in a registered school. This is a compulsory government requirement for all nationally recognised teacher aide courses regardless of whether you have previously worked in childcare, as a volunteer, as a qualified teacher and so forth – even students applying for RPL (recognition of prior learning) must show 100 logged hours in a registered Australian school (which may include paid hours). While the theory component of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is self-paced and the time to complete each assessment depends on your experience, skills, abilities, literacy level and other related factors as explained earlier, there is no rushing the 100-hour placement – everyone has to do it.

6. How much time will I need each week for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support with the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses?

Students are recommended to dedicate 10-20 hours per week to study in order to comfortably move through the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. Some students may not be able to complete as many hours due to other commitments such as work and caring for children or other people. This is fine and it simply means your teacher aide course may take longer to complete. When you enrol in your teacher aide course there is an option to choose casual, part-time or full-time. This information is used by your trainer to develop your ‘support and assessment plan’ which is a rough guide to what you are intending to achieve each month.


A common strategy of ITAC students is to make temporary arrangements that allow you to study as much as possible (within reason of course) over the medium-term (3-6 months or so). This might mean multiple study sessions each week interspersed with longer blocks of time dedicated specifically to your course (such as full days, a week here and there etc.). Many students treat their teacher aide course like their full-time or part-time job; working a standard 8-4 on Monday and Tuesday for example, with lunch and tea breaks. Note that students who are in employment will need to consider arrangements for the 100 hour placement. This may mean taking annual leave in some cases (it can be completed 1 day per week but is most commonly completely 3-5 days per week).


At ITAC, we place an emphasis on teaching our students a range of metacognitive skills, such as:

  • study skills such as organising, underlying, note-taking, planning techniques,
  • reading strategies such as pre-reading, active reading and post-reading activities,
  • routines and systems,
  • process and concept learning,
  • spaced learning and massed practice,
  • deliberate and purposeful practice,
  • techniques for setting goals including micro-goals, and
  • many others.

Developing metacognitive skills helps our students to study effectively and efficiently. A common pattern that we see from successful ITAC students is a structured weekly routine. They plan for and dedicate periods of time to learning and remove any distractions (including mobile phones and TVs). Some people hang their routine or calendar on their fridge for everyone in their home to see. Metacognitive skills can be used for the rest of your life in any course or workplace – they are invaluable no matter where you go.


A common approach to completing the compulsory 100-hour work placement requirement of both teacher aide courses is to dedicate a block of time (usually 16 days) to complete it from start to finish. However, other students undertake their work placement for 1, 2 or 3 days per week over a longer period. The placement is a government requirement and must be completed by every student in a registered Australian school.


It’s important to understand that the work placement cannot be completed until most of the course theory assessments are submitted and marked. The reason for this is that the placement is designed so that students can practise the types of things that they have learnt and been assessed on earlier in their course – in other words, student are given the opportunity to put theory into practice.

7. How many units are there in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support requires 17 units to be completed, including 12 core units and 5 elective units.


All of these units are listed earlier on this page – you can learn more about each of these units by clicking on their respective unit title or code and reading the unit descriptor. More detailed information can be found by visiting the government’s national register of VET and reading the overview of each unit. For example, the CHCEDS006 - Support the development of numeracy skills says:


‘This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to implement numeracy programs as identified by the teacher to assist students requiring additional numeracy support. This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.’


However, it’s important to understand that ITAC does not deliver and assess our teacher aide courses on a unit-by-unit basis like most other providers. We employ what is known as a holistic (or integrated) course structure. This efficient approach is used by the military and various emergency services organisations. Each assessment task collects evidence against multiple units to reduce repetition. This means a reduction in the number of duplicate assessment items and tasks. Overlapping requirements between units are combined.


The holistic design structure used exclusively by the Institute of Teacher Aide Courses enables ITAC students to work through 5 clusters that are based on key aspects of the education support job role. This is much more efficient than studying 17 separate units as many of them have overlapping and common requirements. For example, evidence for a unit may be achieved and collected from 1, 2, 3, 4 or even all 5 clusters. For this reason, our CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support students start and finish all 17 units at the same time. This means that the units themselves are not that relevant – our students study in clusters, not units. There are 5 clusters in our courses which we refer to as: Safety, behaviour, literacy and numeracy, disabilities, and finally, diversity.


Teacher aide with materials ready for play-based learning activity in a school.

There are 17 units in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support which cover a range of skills including play-based learning as pictured above.

8. Is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support a nationally recognised course?

Yes, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is a nationally recognised qualification. This means that your certificate will be recognised by all schools across Australia, as well as by other training providers if you seek credit for other courses in the future.


All nationally recognised teacher aide courses are listed on the federal government’s VET training register. You can see the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support course here. However, it should be noted that even though the course is nationally recognised, each training provider sets up their teacher aide course differently. This includes different:

  • assessment tools and methods,
  • topics or clusters,
  • skills and knowledge,
  • duration and schedules,
  • expectations,
  • support services,
  • resources and materials,
  • trainers and assessors,
  • rules and policies,
  • and so forth.

For example, a unit of competency may require students to learn and know about ‘teaching strategies’, but each RTO will then interpret that requirement in very different ways depending on:

  • characteristics of their student cohort,
  • whether they purchase or have developed their own materials, and
  • the expertise of their staff.

Think of these course differences between training providers like a year 3 classroom in regional WA compared to inner Sydney – they are both based on the same national curriculum, but in many respects are worlds apart in how those requirements are interpreted, planned, implemented, and assessed.


ITAC is registered by ASQA (the national regulator of VET in Australia) to provide training and assessment services for all teacher aide courses that we are approved to deliver (including the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support). ITAC’s registration number is 52215. As a Registered Training Organisation (or RTO for short), ITAC must comply with the Standards for RTOs 2015 and other requirements (such as the Disability Standards for Education 2005).

9. Is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support an online teacher aide course?

The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support can be completed at ITAC via class-based or distance-learning modes (distance mode is also known as external, correspondence or online mode). Online mode is a delivery method that heavily relies on the use of technological solutions for student participation in particular the use of a learner or student portal (called a LMS or Learner Management System).


At the Institue to Teacher Aide Courses, this is by far the most popular mode as it provides maximum flexibility. Students can study when they want – 5 minutes here, 10 minutes there, 6 hours here, 5 days straight there, take a break when you need it, etc. It means you can study after putting the kids to bed a night, you can study on the bus or train – wherever you like – even while sitting on the toilet!


Distance or online mode has become increasingly popular with each passing year, particularly as the wider community becomes more tech-savvy and comfortable with using technology for learning purposes. Even people who don’t own a computer can now ‘study’ on their mobile phone (which is not recommended for the whole course though, especially for assessments). This is becoming known as m-learning.


Students studying the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support online can easily log into their course at a time that suits them and for as long as they want. The best part about online learning (at least with ITAC) is that all students have access to range of student services, such as:

  • class lectures and webinars,
  • one-on-one meetings and small group training sessions,
  • calling or emailing your trainer for support when needed, and
  • attending classes if you can make it (subject to space).

Online learning is not about studying in a deep, dark basement and never speaking to anyone – a high-quality online teacher aide course involves:

  • adequate support from a friendly, experienced industry professional,
  • engaging, practical and accessible learning materials, and
  • providers employing the known principles of effective andragogy (effective strategies or approaches to teaching adults).

You can see examples of what ITAC’s online learning portal looks like by going to our sample page.

10. What is the best course to become a teacher aide or teacher assistant?

The best way to become a teacher aide or teacher assistant is by enrolling in ITAC'sTeacher Aide Combo. The Teacher Aide Combo gives students two certificates for not much more time, cost, or effort than a single qualification. It is in fact the ITAC's most popular teacher aide course and is suitable for most students who are fluent in English and wish to pursue a career as a teacher aide or teacher assistant in an Australian school. ITAC's teacher aide combo gives you double the fire power when applying for positions in schools. Not only will it help you get a job in the first place, but it will help you to get your dream job – and, get it faster. This means more time in the workforce earning money and doing what you love best – supporting children’s learning and development.


Some students, such as those who are applying for government subsidies, may not be able to enrol in ITAC's Teacher Aide Combo. The government only subsidises individual courses under programs such as the Certificate 3 Guarantee which is provided by the Queensland government. For this reason, many students in Queensland choose to study the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and then move to the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support soon thereafter.


For students who cannot afford the Teacher Aide Combo, or who are a little hesitant to enrol, we recommend the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support as the second preferred option. The reason is because this teacher aide course is higher than the Certificate III and is centred around working with special needs students. Due to these two factors alone, graduates are more likely to find work quicker and easier with the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support (in our experience). This is not to say that the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education is not a valuable qualification – it certain is, but obviously the higher your qualification, the better your job prospects.


Noting this, some students feel more comfortable enrolling in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. This is the minimum qualification required by schools in Australia and covers all of the basics of working as a teacher aide in mainstream classes. To work with special needs however, particularly students with multiple disabilities and complex needs, the higher qualification is preferred by schools.


Note that there is currently no legal requirement (anywhere in Australia) to hold a qualification in order to work as a teacher aide. Technically, this means you could find work as a teacher aide with no qualifications whatsoever. To do so is rare however, because schools want to ensure that their support staff are well trained and ready for the challenges of working in a busy, dynamic, and sometimes stressful classroom environment.

11. Where does the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support qualify me to work?

Graduates of ITAC's CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support can work in Australian schools as a teacher aide or teacher assistant under the broad supervision of a teacher. This includes all the different types of schools such as:

  • primary schools including pre-primary,
  • high schools,
  • middle schools,
  • senior colleges,
  • combined schools (k-12 schools),
  • special need's schools and centres,
  • alternative schools such as Montessori,
  • specialist programs such as language centres, SAER schools (Students at Educational Risk), and behaviour centres.

Graduates of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support may find work in government or non-government schools (including independent public schools), metro and regional or remote schools, faith based schools, boarding schools, and various speciality schools such as for the gifted and talented, and agricultural schools. In other words, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support qualifies you to work in any school in Australia as a teacher aide or teacher assistant.


Importantly, this teacher aide course covers some of the basic aspects of working with special needs. The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support however, is largely devoted to working with students with special needs including behaviour management techniques, teaching strategies, professional skills, understanding of specific disabilities and disorders, using assistive technology, and legal and policy implications. For this reason, if you plan on working with special needs students of any kind including autism, we recommend the higher-level qualification or the Teacher Aide Combo. To learn more about working with students with autism we recommend accessing the Autism Association’s website.

12. When can I start my placement for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

When students enrol in their teacher aide course, they are often very keen to begin their placement. The placement is important because it is where many students end up working as paid employees (usually relief or casual to begin with). However, before starting your placement you will need to complete a certain amount of your course – about 70-80% of the theory in most cases. This ensures that students learn the essential and vital background knowledge such as health and safety, following policies, best practice support strategies, best practice behaviour management techniques, and how your role fits within the overarching learning goals of the school, classroom and learning program.


Once students have grasped the theory, they can then enter the workplace and practice what they have been reading and learning about. For example, at ITAC students learn about best practice literacy support techniques by reading, watching videos and completing activities. Armed with this foundational knowledge they can then implement these strategies in a real-world classroom environment (with real children, teachers, resources and issues!).


Some students begin their placement before this point (after obtaining approval from the trainer first). This may happen if the student is already volunteering or working in a school or if the placement hours are being completed one day per week. To experience the full gamut of working a school day, students are required to work full days as this is how teacher aides are employed (very rarely do teacher aides work half days and almost never do they work 2 hour shifts).


Students who have an idea of where they want to go for placement can begin asking their contacts about the possibility of a placement earlier in their teacher aide course (friends, family, local schools) in preparation for their placement in coming months. This helps to secure your placement as schools have a limited capacity in terms of volunteer students.

13. Do I need to find a placement for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?
Teacher aide on placement in front of books and bookshelf.

Students on placement in a school complete a range of structured activities designed to improve their pedagogical knowledge.


Once enrolled in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support, students are provided with a raft of information about their placement including the WPL info pack (WPL is short for Workplace Learning). Students do not have to worry about their placement until later in the teacher aide course although many like to begin thinking about and potentially organising their placement in the first few months after enrolment.


Students who know someone that already works in a school (teacher, teacher aide, school manager, deputy, admin etc.) can ask if they are able to complete a placement in that school or class. From there, the school completes a simple online form (usually a deputy or principal) which is then processed by ITAC who ensures that the school is appropriate, safe, and suitable for the student. This is the preferred method for organising the placement as it means that students can complete their 100 hours at their preferred school, on suitable dates, with a teacher that they already know (and who knows them), and in a class or subject similar to where they intend on working in the future.


ITAC can organise a placement for a student however the student is unlikely to be placed in their preferred school, class, age group, or topic, and they will usually not have met the teacher before. Some students many need to travel or work with age groups that are less preferred. The reason for this is that schools are inundated with requests for placement from TAFEs, other providers, and universities all year round. Some schools refuse to take students altogether while others are very busy dealing with the usual (and unusual) things that schools have to deal with each and every day – placements are often low on their list of priorities.


Another advantage of this approach is that the student can work in a school with the added support of someone with whom they have an existing relationship – this can make the placement less confronting and stressful. As the teacher already knows the student and their strengths, weaknesses, background, abilities and goals, the advice, guidance, tasks and mentorship is more targeted and appropriate to the individual’s professional development needs.


You can learn about schools in your area by visiting the website of the education department in your state or territory such as the schools online directory in WA, this tool in SA, this government database in Victoria, here for NSW, or here for Queensland. You can also check non-government and independent schools in your state or territory such as the Catholic Education office/department or the Independent Schools Association in your state (such as here for WA).


Students also need to organise their clearances. This is usually done soon after enrolling in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. The type of clearances that you need depends on your state or territory. Click here to view the clearances required for each state and territory.

14. How long is the placement for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

The minimum requirement for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is 100 hours in a registered Australian school approved by ITAC. Normally the 100 hours is completed over 16 full days of work in a classroom environment as a teacher aide. The 100-hour requirement is met by tallying the total hours worked in a classroom or similar environment undertaking activities to support student learning and related tasks. The occasional excursion and other school-based activities outside of the classroom can also be counted. This may include a small number of hours for admin tasks. It does not include planning, resource development, or other activities undertaken at home.


The 100-hour requirement is actually not a requirement of the qualification per se: several units (mostly core units) include a minimum of 100 hours as part of their published assessment requirements. This is by-the-by and effectively means the whole qualification has a 100-hour school-based requirement. The following units are part of ITAC’s CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and each contain the 100-hour requirement:

  • CHCEDS002 Assist implementation of planned educational programs
  • CHCEDS003 Contribute to student education in all developmental domains
  • CHCEDS021 Assist in facilitation of student learning
15. What are the assessments like in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

Broadly speaking the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support (at least with ITAC – each provider sets up their teacher aide course in their own way) is divided into 2 main sections:

  1. theory (which is mainly short-answer questions of between 30-100 words with a few longer answers up to 300 words), and
  2. workplace assessments (which includes a portfolio and demonstration). The demonstration requires the student to complete several work-based activities, such as managing a small group literacy lesson. This is completed in the workplace in front of the assessor who visits the school. The supervisor also completes a report which is used to authenticate the evidence collected by the assessor (what we see is a reflection of how the student performed throughout the placement).

The assessment model for CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is based on an integrated model of assessment using short-answer questions (there are no essays), a workplace portfolio, workplace scenarios (role plays and verbal questions) and workplace demonstrations. A supervisor’s report is also collected and used as evidence to authenticate and verify the student’s performance over the whole period of their work placement.


The following assessment methods are used in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support:


Short answer questions
Students answer questions with short-to-medium length responses (between 30-350 words as a guide). There are also mini-projects, resource development, case studies, hypotheticals and a bunch of other assessment activities that make learning more realistic, engaging and relevant in terms of the job outcome.


Portfolio
Students collect evidence of their work while on placement and undertake a range of contextualised activities (such as a reflection activity, resource development and a hazard inspection). The portfolio is like a scrapbook except that it is much more structured in terms of what must be included.


Scenarios
Students provide responses to a series of scenarios or role plays. The response is contextualised to the classroom’s resources, year group, rules, policies and learning topics relevant to the workplacment (the scenarios and role plays are completed face to face (assessor and student) at the school when the assessor visits to observe and assess).


Workplace demonstrations
The assessor observes the students undertaking a range of tasks in the workplace (such as supporting one-on-one and small-group literacy activities). ITAC visit every student in the workplace to provide guidance, advice and support which is essential for fine-tuning your classroom practice in order to maximise your usefulness and hence employability.


Supervisor’s report
The supervisor’s report is not an assessment per se; it collects evidence to authenticate the candidate’s performance over the period of the work placement. It helps to ensure that the workplace demonstrations are typical of the candidate’s performance when the assessor is not present (as the assessor is only on-site for a short period of time comparative to the main classroom teacher who directly and indirectly observes the student over the full 100 hours in many more situations, contexts, topics, lessons etc.).

16. What will I learn in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

ITAC teaches best practice and research-based skills, strategies and techniques similar to those that teachers learn and use day-to-day in the classroom. Broadly speaking there are 4 key areas of study in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support to help students develop their skills and knowledge to effectively support learning, the teacher and the logistical operations of the classroom:

  1. teaching and learning strategies,
  2. behaviour management techniques,
  3. professional skills, and
  4. supporting disabilities and other additional needs.

Teaching and learning strategies are a primary and essential part of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. They are relevant to almost every part of your work as a teacher aide regardless of where you work or with year or subject – for example, a single strategy (such as effective questioning techniques) can be used in all topics, subject, classes, ages, schools and states/territories with all students (including those with and without a disability or disorder). This includes kindergarten right through to year 12 and 13 and even when teaching adults in professional environments such as seminars and conferences. The strategies that you will learn in your teacher aide course depends on your provider however - no two providers are the same just as no two restaurants are the same. Some of the strategies that you will come across in ITAC’s CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support include:

  • scaffolding – the teacher gradually withdraws their support in a task until the student can complete the task independently.
  • chunking – the teacher divides a program, task, topic, list or process into small chunks to make learning more manageable.
  • motivational strategies – a set of strategies used by teachers to encourage students to engage more enthusiastically in learning activities.
  • one-on-one tutoring – a teacher dedicates their undivided attention to a single student (for example, before or after school).
  • think-alouds – verbalising your thoughts when completing an activity (such as when a teacher demonstrates a task).
  • setting goals – specifying what students will be able to do and know by the end point of a learning program or lesson.
  • questioning skills – a set of techniques used by teachers when asking questions (such as wait time and bounce methods).
  • feedback techniques – a set of techniques used by teachers when providing information to students about their performance.
  • graphic organisers – refer to a large number of usually paper-based tools that help students to visualise the relationships between facts, concepts, problems, themes or ideas.
  • language development – a myriad of strategies that aim to improve language skills (such as phonics, spelling, grammar, punctuation, reading and writing).

To learn more about what you will learn in your teacher aide course and what teacher aides do in day to day, we recommend reading the following articles by ITAC:

Female teacher aide with young students playing a game.

ITAC students learn dozens of research-based strategies such as play based learning.

17. Do I need the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support to start the Certificate IV?

Not at ITAC. However, many providers require students to complete the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or a relevant qualification at a similar or higher level. This is because any years ago an older version of the Certificate IV required the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support as a pre-requisite - some providers have not updated their entry requirements.


At ITAC, students may enter the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support or the Teacher Aide Combo without first completing the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support provided it is likely that the student will be successful at this level – we don’t want to set students up to fail. Students can choose the program that best meets their needs, abilities and goals. For many students, particularly those who have no issues with English, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is too easy and simple, hence why we recommend that most students enter the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support or the Teacher Aide Combo.


However, this does not mean that all students should enrol in the higher-level CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support – but only that there is no legal or other government requirement that prevents students from doing so. In saying that, and in our experience over a very long time, fluent English speakers have had no issues with enrolling and completing the higher-level Certificate IV without first completing the introductory Certificate III. The main reason that students withdraw from our teacher aide courses is not because the courses are difficult but because they lose interest, lack commitment or desire, find work elsewhere or decide to go in another direction. Very rarely do students withdraw due to the course being difficult.


While there is a slight difference between the 2 teacher aide courses in terms of complexity and difficulty, students tend to be successful at both levels unless they have obvious barriers to learning such as significant LLN (language, literacy or numeracy) issues or a learning disorder of some type. In the past, we have helped students from all walks of life to complete both teacher aide courses including, as an example, those with hearing and visual impairment, In other words, which course your enrol in is really up to you.


Younger students (such as those who are enrolled in or who have very recently graduated from high school) may be counselled to enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support initially – this prevents these students from enrolling in a course that may be beyond their capabilities at this point in their learning trajectory. Younger people who are confident and capable learners however tend to do very well with either teacher aide course provided that they have a solid routine are are consistent in their learning. Having family support can also be very beneficial.


For specific advice based on your situation and circumstances, please speak to an ITAC adviser by calling 1300 858 191 or contact our office with a quick message.

18. How do I find a teacher aide job after the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

There are tens of thousands of schools in Australia and almost all of them employ dozens of teacher aides or teacher assistants. In fact, government reports show that about 30% of people employed in schools are support staff such as teacher aides and teacher assistants. Once you have completed the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support you may consider seeking work in any one of these schools, including:

  • pre-primary and primary schools,
  • high schools,
  • senior schools,
  • special needs schools, or
  • any of the alternative and specialist schools in your area.

We have published a detailed article about how to find work as a teacher. To summarise this article, our experience (with thousands of graduates) is that the most common pathway into a long and stable career as an education support worker is to finish the CHC30213 Certificate IV in Education Support first, and to then apply for causal work in a dozen or so local schools. Casual work in the education industry is known as ‘relief work'. Relief workers are paid a loading (usually 25% depending on the state or territory), but they do not receive annual or personal leave.


Interjection: How many states and territories are there in Australia? Did you say 8 – then you would be wrong. There are actually 16 states and territories in Australia. Don’t believe us? Look it up. Now you can trick your friends and family thanks to ITAC!


To apply for relief work, simply hand in your resume, a copy of your work clearance and ask to be placed on the school’s relief list for teacher assistants (note that depending on your state or territory, teacher aides may be called learning support officers, integration aides, classroom assistants, education assistants etc.). In time, you will be called and asked to work a day here and a day there. Eventually, you will pick up more and more work until a contract becomes available. Short-term contracts eventually become year-long contracts which can lead to a permanent position. While some people graduate and walk straight into a permanent position, most schools like to get to know you first and tend to only offer contracts to people that have proved themselves to be effective practitioners.


We also recommend that you keep a close eye on various employment websites (particularly those for your state or territory’s education department). For example, check these sites every couple of weeks or so:

You are also likely to find job advertisements on websites such as SEEK by searching for key words such as teacher aide jobs.

19. What do teacher aides do?
Colourful table with cards and learning resources for fun phonics activity

A learning area set up by an ITAC student in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support ready for students. Could you do this?


Teacher aides work under the direction of a teacher (either directly or indirectly) to:

  • support learning,
  • manage behaviour,
  • assist students with disabilities to engage with the school community and its activities, and to
  • provide general support with the logistical needs of the classroom.

The majority of teacher aides work with students with special needs (such as students with autism, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and physical disabilities). Teacher aides are mainly employed to assist teachers by providing support to students who require one-on-one assistance. They effectively reduce class sizes, meaning that more students can access differentiated (individualised) learning opportunities.


According to joboutlook.gov.au:

  • ‘teachers' aides assist teaching staff in preparing teaching materials and with general classroom tasks’,
  • ‘demonstrate, supervise and participate in activities which enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of children in schools’, and finally they
  • ‘assist children with intellectual, physical and behavioural difficulties…’

Teacher aides can be broadly categorised into 2 camps:
1. mainstream teacher aides who work with students in mainstream settings.
These teacher aides support the class as a whole, including multiple students who need more generalised support and/or who have a mild disability or disorder. They often work in the lower years and are expected to help with the higher logistical demands of working with large groups of young children. This includes:

  • toileting,
  • food preparation,
  • cleaning,
  • sanitising,
  • preparing resources, and
  • storing equipment and other such tasks.

Students working at this level are known as Level 1 or 2 teacher aides (the title/classification varies from state/territory to state/territory). They usually hold the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support as a minimum.


2. Special needs education assistants (also known as integration aides in Victoria, school support officers (SSOs) in SA, learning support officers in NSW and special needs education assistants (or EAs) in WA).


People in these positions work in special needs schools or inclusive classrooms (an inclusive classroom is a mainstream class that has a student with special needs). They most often work on a one-on-one basis with an allocated student who requires constant individual support. Common student disabilities and disorders include:

  • autism,
  • severe behavioural and neurological issues,
  • physical disabilities, and
  • the added complication of comorbidities (2 or more issues, disabilities or disorders, such as autism and ADHD – attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).

These positions are known as Level 3 (or similar) and are the highest paid positions in schools as far as teacher aides are concerned. Note that there is now a more recent Level 4 (sometimes called ‘lead’ position, which is for senior teacher aides with experience, qualifications and who have demonstrated an ability to implement teaching and learning strategies, to support behaviour management effectively with best practice, and to manage and coordinate other teacher aides. Lead teacher aides (usually called Lead EAs in WA) earn more than their peers due to the additional responsibilities and as a reward for their experience and effective input to the teaching and learning process.


Special needs EAs (as they are called in WA) almost always hold at least the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. However, they are often expected to hold the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support due to their work with students with special needs. In some states/territories, holding higher qualifications also entitles the employee to a higher pay tier. You can read more about how much teacher aides get paid in Australia (including a state/territory breakdown and many common questions) here .


Something worth pondering is how effective teacher aides are in terms of student learning development. Researchers in this area agree that untrained (or poorly trained) teacher aides actually have a negative impact on students learning. There are various reasons for this, including:

  • using incorrect behaviour management techniques,
  • demotivating students which ‘shuts them down’,
  • concentrating on task completion instead of skills development or concept learning (thinking micro instead of macro), and
  • the fact that a teacher aide in the class means that some students receive less attention from the teacher (who is the best trained and most well-equipped person to diagnose, assess, provide feedback, implement new targeted interventions, adjust strategies, and adjust activities and resources etc.). The teacher may assume that the student is receiving plenty of support and therefore provide less support as a result.

However, well-trained teacher aides are very effective particularly in key areas like reading skills development and provided they have been trained in best practice strategies and techniques by a reputable provide. A 2020 random controlled trial (RCT) conducted in 105 schools concluded that a teacher’s aide:

  • ‘is not just a class-size reduction, but especially impactful when sharing instructional responsibility for the classroom’ and
  • ‘may supplement educated teachers by handling other kinds of pedagogical tasks in the classroom’.

In other words, capable, trained and experienced teacher aides may take on many of the tasks that were traditionally completed by the teacher and they may have similar positive effects on learning outcomes. This includes implementing a range of learning programs (such as literacy and numeracy) for students who need targeted remedial or interventional ‘catch-ups’. The key word here however is ‘capable’ – ensure that you enrol with a reputable provider to ensure that you get the best training possible in order to be become an invaluable and essential team member.


To learn more about this topic we have defined and discussed the role of teacher aides in our many detailed articles such as:

20. How much do teacher aides earn after the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

The average teacher aide is paid around $30 per hour, $195 per day, $975 per week or $50,700 per year (based on a 6.5-hour day). However, the amount you might expect to earn when you first start your career is probably going to be less than this average. It also depends on:

  • which state or territory you work in,
  • the type of position (special needs or mainstream),
  • the type of school (government or non-government), and
  • a range of other factors.

Like any industry, the salary variation is quite wide. Teacher aides in Australia can expect to earn between $24 and $37 per hour.


The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support generally doesn’t increase your expected salary above someone who has not completed this teacher aide course. If it does, the difference is often minor. The purpose of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support (and ITAC’s other nationally recognised courses) is to give you the essential skills and knowledge to work effectively as a teacher aide and to get a job as a teacher aide in the first place. You will need to hold a qualification to get your foot in the door.


Holding the qualification tells schools that you have the necessary skills and that you will work in a safe and professional manner. It is well known that improperly trained (or untrained) support staff have a negative effect on student learning. For example, inadequately trained staff tend to give answers to students instead of implementing the correct strategy to help them develop wider concept understanding. This is why teacher aide courses such as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support are so highly valued by employers and are the minimum requirement before starting work in a school.


We have published a very detailed blog article about how much teacher aides get paid in Australia including a state by state breakdown.

21. Am I eligible to do the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support by RPL?

Broadly speaking, we use the following 3 guidelines when determining if a student will be successful in a recognition of prior learning (RPL) program:

  1. have they worked as a full-time equivalent (FTE) for 5 years or more in a relevant role (excluding childcare) in a registered Australian school?
  2. have they completed any other relevant qualifications (or extensive ongoing professional development) from a range of providers over a period of time?
  3. are they currently working in a school in a relevant role (for example, as a teacher aide)?

Candidates who do not meet all 3 criteria are more than likely not going to be successful with an RPL application – this means the application is a waste of money and time from the student’s perspective, not to mention the associated stress and frustration. If you are in any doubt about your eligibility, we recommend reading our FAQ page, our RPL flyer and our credit (or RPL) policy in our student handbook.


Accelerated program
We also encourage many RPL applicants to enrol in the full CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and to do the accelerated program. This gives you access to the full suite of learning resources and support. These resources are likely to be very useful as technically with RPL there is no training, learning support or academic guidance. RPL is a pure ‘assessment-only process’ – effectively a series of exams.


RPL and distance students with significant experience and prior training are encouraged to consider the accelerated program. Students enrol in the standard CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and then negotiate a support and assessment plan with their trainer who tailors their program, schedule and routine based on their experience, goals and abilities. For example, this could mean reducing the expected course hours from 650 to 100 – not quite as fast as RPL, but there are many more benefits such as being able to access support and read through the latest best practice teaching strategies.


Note that all students are required to complete a work placement of 100 hours as this is requirement of the government’s training package. Students currently working in a school (provided the position is relevant) can use their paid hours towards their 100-hours (under certain conditions and after approval).


Our accelerated program being a full enrolment (unlike RPL) gives all students 12 months access to all learning and support services. This is great for when unexpected obstacles get in the way of your study or if you just need a break. Of course it goes without saying that you motor through the teacher aide course quite quickly (hence the name – accelerated), but you also have the peace of mind of knowing that the full 12 months in available should you need to use it to.

22. I have a degree – can I get RPL/credit for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

There is no automatic credit or RPL process for individuals who either hold a tertiary degree or who have completed part of a degree. This includes the BA in Education and its various iterations and specialities. The 3 criteria for RPL entry (experience, ongoing training and current school employment) must be met by all applicants (particularly the requirement for substantial experience as a teacher aide in Australian schools).


Being degree-qualified alone does not mean that a person already has the skills and knowledge required by rules of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. In fact, the requirements of all education support programs are very different to the topics studied at university level (for example, pedagogical approaches, policies and procedures). The CHC3013 Certificate III in Education Support also requires a minimum of 100 hours of work placement in a school as a teacher aide. These hours must be completed during your enrolment period and an ITAC assessor will attend the school to complete the mandatory assessments. We recommend reading our FAQ page, our RPL flyer, and our credit (or RPL) policy in our student handbook.


However, the good news if you have previously studied at degree (or higher) level is that you will more than likely be able to work through the course materials faster and easier than many other students. If you have completed a degree, you will generally have better writing skills than a person who is new to studying. Your existing knowledge will also mean that many topics in the teacher aide course can be learnt in a fraction of the time compared to someone who is new to the industry.


We also recommend our accelerated program which is suitable for students who believe they can work through the course faster, but who are not eligible for RPL. Students in our accelerated program enrol in the standard course (usually by distance mode) and subsequently work with their trainer to negotiate a schedule that allows them to work through the course requirements much faster (noting that ITAC’s CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is a self-paced program excluding 100-hour workplace requirement).

23. What's the difference between RPL and credit?
Teacher aide sitting in big chair in reading corner.

ITAC student showing us her favourite book from the reading corner.


In short, a credit is provided for a person has completed the exact same unit in the past whereas RPL (or Recognition of Prior Learning) is a way to have your existing skills and knowledge tested against the requirements of each unit of competency. RPL is for candidates who:

  • are currently employed in a relevant role,
  • have significant experience, and
  • who have completed ongoing professional development.

We recommend reading our FAQ page, our RPL flyer and our credit (or RPL) policy in our student handbook.


Under the Australian VET system, RTOs can only grant credit when the EXACT same unit (code and title) has been completed previously. There are some rare exceptions (such as when the government deems an old unit to be equivalent to a new unit). However, these exceptions do not apply to any of the education support courses at this point in time.


The easiest way to check which units could be credited to you is to compare what you have completed (by looking at the documentation issued by your previous provider) with the units listed on our website (under the units tab of the relevant teacher aide course). You MUST have completed the EXACT same unit (code and title) and have verifiable evidence for the credit to be granted. This is a legal requirement and cannot be waivered or negotiated under any circumstances (including by any provider under the Australian VET system).


It is common for eligible RPL candidates to enrol in the full CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support as a distance student instead of an RPL program. This enables them to access the full suite of resources and ongoing dedicated support, as well as having extra time (12 months compared to 6) to complete the teacher aide course if unexpected life obstacles get in the way.


Our students can enrol in the accelerated program which can be similar (if not the same) as RPL assessment in terms of the number of hours to complete. They can also use their distance enrolment and the associated access to resources as a type of refresher training. Students in our Accelerated program complete the exact same assessments as RPL candidates, but they have the added benefit of being able to access all of the learning materials and support when needed. RPL on the other hand technically has no support or learning as it is an AOP (Assessment Only Process) not dissimilar to a series of exams or tests.

24. I have a childcare diploma. Can I do the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support by RPL?

We have many enquiries from students who have:

  • completed a related CHC course (such as an early childhood course),
  • completed a VET course with overlapping units (such as an aged care course), or
  • completed a VET-level qualification in another country.

Under the current government standards, ITAC will recognise and credit any identical unit provided verifiable AQF documentation can be provided as per our credit policy. Credit can be granted for full courses and RPL enrolments.


However, to enter an RPL program, candidates must still meet the 3 requirements listed earlier for RPL entry (experience, ongoing training and current school employment). It’s important to understand that experience in a childcare service (or similar environment) cannot be used in place of the requirement to have experience in a school. The reason for this is that the early childhood sector is very different to the primary and high school sector (not to mention the government rules are very clear). Consider for example the different:

  • curriculums,
  • policies and procedures,
  • laws and regulations,
  • pedagogical approachs, and
  • general day-to-day practices.

The types of pedagogical knowledge required in an education support role are different to childcare (for example, play-based learning strategies in early childhood compared to explicit instruction in schools).


The good news is that your previous study and experience may mean that you are able to complete your CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support course much faster and easier than most students. This is because all teacher aide courses at ITAC are self-paced (except for the workplace requirement of 100 hours in a registered school).


You can also learn more about our accelerated program on our RPL flyer.

25. I have not studied before. Is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support suitable?

We get this question all the time! Why? Because a large portion of students who enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support (and the higher Certificate IV for that matter) have not been ‘in school’ for a very long time. Naturally these people are apprehensive and concerned about whether they will be successful, whether they are ‘good enough’, how much of a strain attempting a teacher aide course will put on their other commitments and lifestyle, and if it will all be worth it.


Our advice is this: almost everyone is in the same boat. Will it be stressful or frustrating from time to time? Yes – learning anything new can be stressful and frustrating. You will get some questions wrong; you will not understand some things (initially); and yes, you will go through stages where you say to yourself, ‘why am I doing this?’. This is completely natural - instinctual in fact - but all students the world-over have the same experience. Remember that every student gets the same certificate in the end, whether they just scape through or they are the best student we have ever seen.


Here is what we tell people who are really nervous about studying: the education support courses are not as difficult as you might think. This is certainly the case for fluent English speakers who have many years of experience with children (such as parents) – you can think of the teacher aide course as simply professionalising what you already know into a formal setting (with some added jargon, hints and tips, as well as bits and pieces such as laws, policies and procedures).


There are no essays or exams. There is no screaming teacher like you may have experience in school – we want you to succeed and we will do whatever we can to help and support you. Another way to think of it is like this – the average age of our students is 37, most have children, most have some work experience but little or no relevant training, and yet over 80% complete the course without too many hiccups – yes, 80%+. In other words, your chances of success, provided that you stick with the course, are pretty good – very few withdraw because their teacher aide course is difficult in terms of the learning and assessment material.


Of those who don’t finish the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support, there are a variety of contributing factors, including:

  • finding work elsewhere,
  • moving to another country,
  • losing interest,
  • financial or family-related issues,
  • time restraints,
  • health issues and so forth.

Some people enrol when they are just not that interested or excited about working as teacher aide and eventually decide to move on to something else. In other words, students that are dedicated, committed and who have a desire to work as a teacher aide generally have no problems with either the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. The completion rate for both of these teacher aide courses is about the same.


Also bear in mind our 30-day, no-obligation period – if the course is not for you – no worries – maybe come back and try again in a couple of years.


A caveat is needed at this point – this advice is general and may not be relevant to you – contact ITAC if you are concerned or want individualised advice.

26. As a mum with children, will I cope with the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

Yes – we believe that for most people in your situation, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is achievable provided that you are committed to the teacher aide course and you set aside regular time each week to study. In fact, the majority of students seeking to enter this industry are in the same situation!


Sure, there will be times where you are unable to study (sick children, holidays, peak periods at work, etc.). However, if you persist and stick with a routine, you should make it through without too many issues. The number one reason why students do not complete this course is a lack of persistence – it’s not that the course is difficult or because of literacy issues – the main barrier is maintaining motivation over a time.


Our teacher aide courses such as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support are specifically designed for students in this situation: busy people who might study for 10 minutes today, 3 hours the next, a week straight, but then can’t do much at all for a week or two. Our students can log into their portal and watch videos, read learning materials and complete activities whenever they have the time.


Completing anything like this is challenging and frustrating at times – the going can be slow – but in no time at all you will see the light at end of the tunnel and you’ll have your nationally recognised certificate in your hands – a great achievement that makes you feel great, raises your self-esteem and may even change your direction in life forever – who knows where it could lead. While there may be the occasional hick-up or moment of despair; we are here to help and guide you all the way. Once you are out in the real-world earning money and working in real classrooms, your teacher aide course will seem like a lifetime ago.

27. Can I attend classes for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

ITAC classes are currently available in Cockburn Central (WA) and the Brisbane CBD for the Teacher Aide Combo and the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. Classes are offered one day per week for ten weeks during family-friendly hours, so you will have time to drop off and pick up kids from school. Our classes are workshops that are friendly, supportive, engaging and delivered by our highly trained and experienced trainers – all of them have many years of experience working as teacher aides or teachers in local schools.


group of ITAC students and trainer in class.

ITAC classes are friendly, adult-orientated environments.


Each class covers one or more topics relevant to your teacher aide course such as:

  • WHS,
  • behaviour management,
  • literacy and numeracy strategies,
  • teaching and learning strategies,
  • professional skills (for example, working with students from diverse backgrounds, classroom logistics, hygiene), and
  • a range of other key topics essential to your work as a teacher aide.

ITAC teaches best practice practical skills and techniques that you can implement during your placement. That’s why our students are so sought after and why many pick up work at their schools after their placement. While completing their 100-hour placement requirement, well-trained students demonstrate how invaluable and useful they are, how much they know, what they can do, and the positive effect that their work has on their students' learning and behaviour.


Students who are distance learners can also ask their trainer if they can attend the occasional ITAC class. We also offer regular face-to-face tutorials in multiple locations and all students are invited to attend. These small group tutorials run from 1-2 hours to a full day. They are a great way to meet other students, as well as to accelerate your learning and progress.


28. I work part-time/full-time. Can I do the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

Many students enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education support while working full-time or part-time. There are 2 things to consider in this situation:

  1. The placement requires at least 16 full days of work in a school. This is mandatory for all students in Australia who enrol in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. The placement can be completed in a block (some students take annual leave) or over a period of time. If you already work in a school, you can use your classroom hours towards the 100-hour requirement. The most popular way to complete this requirement is 3 days per week.

  2. The less time you can devote to your studies, the longer it will take to complete the course.
    If you’re working more than 30 hours per week, you might consider cutting back on work temporarily to devote a full day per week to your studies, or to free you up for blocks of study during the week (such as committing yourself to study from 6:00 – 9:00 several evenings per week, as well as a half day on the weekend).

Being employed full-time or part-time can actually be a benefit as well. Your workplace experience could provide you with a range of skills that may be relevant to your teacher aide course. These transferable skills include:

  • reading and following policies,
  • knowledge of safety and other laws, and
  • knowledge of reporting procedures.

The transferable skills of people who work in industries that involve lots of person-to-person contact are likely to be highly relevant. This includes industries such as aged care, childcare, health, management and emergency services. People from these industries, and other like it, find that they can adopt their existing skills to the new environment quite easily.

STUDENT PLACEMENT

Click below to see past students on placement

ITAC'S VIDEOS

ITAC'S MOST WATCHED VIDEOS

Distance

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Many students prefer to study their course without coming into class on a regular basis. This is commonly referred to as distance learning but can also be called external, online, blended or flexible learning. These terms are very similar and generally mean that:

  • There is little or no attendance on campus
  • Most learning materials are accessed through a website portal
  • Students will often have hardcopy materials as well
  • Students will still have access to support via email and phone
  • Many students still attend tutorials for additional assistance

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. There are many reasons why students choose to study by distance:

  • Classes are not held in the local area
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning classes cover existing knowledge
  • Alternative study programs or pathways
  • Regular travel or hospital stays
  • Existing worker completing a traineeships or RPL

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are not attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Online learning is becoming more and more popular each year and many courses now enrol more online students than class based students.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at itac.edu.au

Class Based Learning

Class based learning is a popular study mode and is great for students who have not studied for a long period of time, who live closer to the training location or who simply enjoy being in class. We always recommend enrolling in a class based mode where possible as students who attend classes are typically more successful.

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in a classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. Class based learning with ITAC involves the following:

  • Attend class one day per week over a period of time
  • Complete set homework activities and assessments between classes
  • Attend tutorial as needed and recommended by your trainer
  • Complete the workplace learning component
  • Regularly accessing resources and learning materials in the online portal
  • Regular contact with trainers via email, phone, individual meetings/tutorials or during class

Students tell us that they enjoy being in class for two main reasons:
Firstly, because they can easily ask questions and trainers can help students when stuck. Note that many courses have online lectures (recorded in class) for distance students.

Secondly, students enjoy the social aspect of class based learning: swapping stories, talking about the course and helping each other along the way. Many students make new friends and study together outside of class time.

There are many reasons why students choose a flexible class based study mode:

  • Attending full time is not possible
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning extensive class time is not an efficient use of time
  • Enrolled in other education programs
  • Regular travel or hospital stays

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner as directed by their trainer. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Flexible learning is becoming more and more popular as people become busier.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at itac.edu.au

Education Support - A Guide

Education Assistants work in schools such as kindergartens, primary schools, high schools and special needs centres.

Education Assistants work under the guidance and instruction of teachers. They can work with a single student for most of the day or float in a class or a number of classes helping many different students.

Education Assistants or EAs for short can also be called integration aides, teacher aides, support workers, teacher assistants, Aboriginal and Indigenous Education Officers or AIEOs, Home Economic Assistants, or school support officers.

Some of the main tasks of an EA includes:

  • Helping individual students with activities and learning
  • Helping small groups of students with activities and learning
  • Helping students with core skills such as reading, writing and numeracy
  • Helping students who have learning difficulties, a disability or a disorder
  • Helping the teacher with behaviour management, ensuring that students are on task
  • Helping the teacher with activities such as cleaning and preparing resources
  • Ensuring that students are safe at all times

Education Assistants are most often employed to work with students who need additional support in learning or due to a disability or behavioural issues.

EAs may also work in specialist positions such as in literacy programs or youth at risk programs.

To obtain work as an EA you will need to have the following:

  • A Working with Children Check
  • Usually a police clearance is also required
  • A relevant qualification such as the Certificate III in Disability or Certificate III in Education Support
  • A suitable demeanour, attitude and presentation to work in a school environment
  • A love of working with children and other people in a team environment
  • A good quality resume and cover letter

Education Assistants undertake many community service work tasks including but not limited to:

  • Working with parents and guardians on a daily basis
  • Assisting with case management (IEPs and IBPs)
  • Organising community events such as excursions and fetes
  • Assisting vulnerable groups of people such as low-socio economic
  • Ensuring abuse and neglect is reported to supervisors
  • Obtaining funding such as grants from government departments or local businesses
  • Organising and assisting with events such as art displays
  • Working with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Assisting with a range of disabilities and disorders
  • Researching and informing clients of support services and networks
  • Liaising with community groups
  • Liaising with specialist case workers such as psychologists and teachers
  • Managing behaviour and learning
  • Planning activities and creating resources

Education assistants often work with children with disabilities including but not limited to:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Dyslexia
  • Processing disorders
  • Developmental delay disorders
  • Foetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Oppositional Defiance Disorder
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Mental health
  • Fragile X
  • Downs Syndrome

It is generally easy to find casual and part time work as an education assistant by putting your name down at all schools in your local area. This often leads to more permanent employment. Many education assistants work part time.

When looking for work, don’t forget special needs schools which are schools within the main school that even have their own Principal, teachers and administration staff. Over 90% of people who enrol in a course to become an education assistant are female and are often mothers who are looking for family friendly work hours.

Depending on the course and level, education assistants learn the following:

  • Safety including duty of care laws
  • Education policy and regulations
  • Supporting students literacy and numeracy learning
  • Instructional techniques (how to help students learn)
  • Techniques for working with a diverse range of people
  • Behaviour management techniques
  • Developmental domains such as cognitive, language and social development
  • Basics of and techniques for working with specific disabilities and disorders
  • Creating activities and basic planning
  • Working with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individual Behaviour Plans (IBPs)
  • Early Years Learning Framework implementation

Working in the education sector is challenging, rewarding and is a never ending learning curve. Rarely will you be bored working as an education assistant as each day presents a new challenge.

If you would like more information, please speak to one of our student advisors.

50

% CHOOSE ITAC

for CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

5000

HAPPY GRADUATES

87

% COMPLETION RATE

89

% SATISFACTION RATING

ITAC'S RESEARCH-BASED TEACHER AIDE COURSES

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

INTRODUCTORY COURSE

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

The introductory teacher aide course covering all the basics of working in a school.

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HIGHER-LEVEL COURSE

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

The industry standard TA course with a focus on disabilities and disorders

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TEACHER AIDE COMBO

Study two courses in one streamlined program.

Save time and money by completing ITAC's popular Teacher Aide Combo.

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SAMPLE RESOURCES

Sample course resources and materials

Be sure to ask your provider for a sample of their resources and assessments before enrolling.

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TESTIMONIALS FROM ITAC GRADUATES

Thousands of graduates - thousands of schools

Sherrie

Thanks to my trainer and ITAC, I know made the right decision to change my career.

Dawn

A wonderful course, awesome trainer and fantastic content!

Rebecca

I enjoyed the course content and the class dynamics. Thank you.

Jenni

It was a great experience learning in a happy, fun and professional atmosphere.

Stephanie

This course has been a fun experience and I now feel confident and ready to begin my new career.

Anjanette

I had the best time doing my course. ITAC staff were all helpful and friendly. Thank you so much.

ABOUT US

The Institute of Teacher Aide Courses is the go-to provider for nationally recognised teacher aide courses. Around 1 in 2 students choose to study Australia's most popular TA course with ITAC.

              

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